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Automotive Body Repairers picture    Automotive Body Repairers image

Automotive body repairers, also called collision repair technicians or auto body mechanics, are highly sought after skilled crafts people who repair parts of vehicles that are damaged by collisions or accidents, rust, or other causes. Most vehicles that have sustained damage from a collision can be repaired and refinished to look and drive like new. An automotive body repairer removes dents, straightens or aligns bent frames or bodies, and replaces parts that cannot be repaired. Collision repair technicians repair all types of vehicles including cars, SUVs, and small trucks. Some choose to specialize in repairing large commercial trucks, school or commuter buses, or tractor-trailers. These vehicles require different training and skills.

Repairing each damaged vehicle presents unique challenges and offers the automotive body repairer variety in their workday as all vehicles sustain different damage. Repairers must be able to determine the appropriate repair procedures and parts needed using the knowledge and training they have received. They must first determine what materials the vehicle is made of, the construction of the vehicle, and the extent of the damage.

Auto Body Mechanics Job Duties and Functions

If the vehicle has been heavily damaged in a collision an automotive body repairer might start the repairs by realigning the vehicle's frame. To realign the vehicles frame a repairer chains or attaches the frame and other damaged sections to alignment machines. These machines use hydraulic pressure to realign damaged areas of the vehicle and return it to its original operating state. Some newer cars are manufactured with "Unibody" design. This method of manufacturing describes cars that are built without frames and they must be repaired to exacting factory specifications for the vehicle to operate correctly after the repairs are complete. For unibody constructed vehicles, repairers use manufacturers benchmark standards and policies to measure the extent to which each section is out of alignment and then use hydraulic machinery to return the damaged vehicle to its original shape.

After the frame is aligned repairers will begin to repair or replace damaged body parts. They remove dents by hammering them out with metalworking tools such as a pneumatic metal-cutting gun. They then smooth out the sections that have been hammered by filing, grinding, or sanding until the finish is smooth. To fill dents that cannot be worked out of the metal collision repair technicians use plastic or solder materials. They file or grind these filler materials to their original shape and then clean the area with a tool that is similar to a sand blaster. Depending on the severity of the damage some sections of the vehicle may have sustained extensive damage and cannot be repaired. Any parts that cannot be repaired would be removed with a cutting torch and replacement parts sized and fitted and welded into the appropriate area.

Plastic body parts are increasingly used on new vehicles and these parts would be fixed or replaced during the repair process. Damaged panels are removed and the collision repair technician identifies the type and properties of the plastic used. There are a wide variety of plastics in use today in new vehicles. For most types of plastic material used in a vehicle, repairers will apply heat from a hot-air welding gun to soften it and then mold the affected sections back into shape using their hands. Sometimes automotive body repairers choose to immerse the affected sections or panels in hot water to soften them prior to molding the areas back into shape manually. Some plastic parts cannot be repaired due to the damage they incurred and those parts will be replaced.

Some body repairers choose to focus their careers on specialties such as fixing fiberglass car bodies or installing and replacing glass in automobiles and other vehicles. Vehicle glass installers are responsible for removing broken or cracked windshields and other window glass. To replace glass the repairer applies a moisture-proofing compound around the perimeter of the glass and then places the glass in the vehicle. To secure and weatherproof the glass to prevent leaks or drafts rubber strips will be installed around the sides of the windshield or windows replaced.

Internal areas of the vehicle may have sustained damage due to a collision. Parts that may need repairs or replacement materials might be the upholstery, seating, dashboards, or inside door panels. In addition, depending on the type and severity of the collision computer and electronic systems might have been impacted and will need to be repaired. Only after all external and internal damage has been repaired would the affected areas of the vehicle be repainted to match the color of the other areas of the car.

To successfully repair a damaged vehicle an automotive body repairer will usually follow these steps:

  • Perform visual inspection of the damages to the vehicle including the outside and undercarriage of the vehicle
  • Test drive the vehicle to accurately determine damage to mechanical, electrical, or computerized components
  • Use computerized testing devices to check operating systems of the vehicle
  • Review the manufacturers technical manuals for updated information on parts to be used and procedures/standards to be followed when making repairs
  • Make accurate estimate of time required to repair vehicle
  • Compile list of parts needed and cost of replacement/new parts
  • Act as liaison with clients insurance company or client to discuss cost adjustments and additional materials and charges as repairs proceed
  • Perform needed repairs including:
  • Alignment, dent removal, replacement of damaged plastic parts and materials, replacement of broken glass, fiberglass body parts, upholstery and other damaged areas inside the car, electrical and computer systems affected by the damage according to manufacturers specifications and established industry standards

Auto Body Mechanics Job Characteristics and Work Environment

Repairers usually work by themselves on the repairs they are assigned with minimal direction from a supervisor. To increase production and improve efficiencies at the shop sometimes assistants or apprentices are assigned to assist experienced repairers. As many larger repair shops use an assembly-line approach repairers would work on one aspect of the repair and their colleagues would work on other portions depending on their specialty. For example, one worker might realign the frame while another would repair metal portions of the car including doors and fenders. Another person would be responsible for plastic and fiberglass parts, another for windshield and other glass, and another for the damage inside the car such as seating, dashboards, etc. Once all repairs are complete the car would be turned over to the automotive painters for painting and refinishing.

Most automotive body repairers work indoors in shops that are often noisy due to the hand tools and power tools and machinery used for repairs. Repairers have a very physically demanding job as they are often standing for extended periods of time or working in cramped spaces in uncomfortable positions. The tools and machinery used are often quite heavy and need to be lifted by hand. Although most shops are well ventilated repairers are exposed to a variety of toxic chemicals, gasoline, solvents, dust and paint fumes that could be hazardous to their health. They must take great care to avoid injuries including cuts from sharp metal objects and power tools and burns from heated metal and heat producing tools. Serious injuries and accidents are rare as most shops practice industry safety standards and keep their shop clean and organized.

Most automotive body repairers work a standard eight hour day, five days a week. Sometimes additional hours are needed on nights and weekends to meet customer demands and depending on the backlog of repair work to be completed. Repairers who own their own shop will put in additional hours developing their customer base, meeting with clients, working with insurance companies and parts distributors, managing staff, and the general administrative tasks such as bill payment and payroll required of all business owners.

To be successful in their profession, automotive body repairers should possess most of the following skills and attributes:

  • Attention to detail
  • Ability to lift heavy parts and equipment, work in confined spaces in awkward positions
  • Aptitude for following instructions and diagrams in manufacturers manuals
  • Interest and passion for learning new technologies to meet rapidly changing car designs and manufacture
  • Concern for personal safety and that of their co-workers
  • Ability to work independently
  • Tolerance for dust, odors, and chemicals
  • Exceptional time management skills to insure repairs are completed according to estimate
  • Flexibility of work schedule to accommodate workload and customer needs - including evenings and weekends
  • A repairer who owns their own shop would also need effective communication and superior customer service skills as well as the expertise to accurately estimate the work hours and parts needed for each repair project

Auto Body Schools and Collision Repair Training

A high school diploma or GED is usually the minimum education required to become a collision repair technician. However more specialized auto body training is needed to learn the techniques needed for the newer more sophisticated vehicles that often have computerized operating systems. Many postsecondary vocational schools and local community colleges offer courses in electronics, physics, chemistry, and computers, which provide a great background for anyone interested in a career as an automotive body repairer. These training programs would also combine classroom instruction and hands-on practice on damaged vehicles. Vocational, trade, and technical school programs typically offer certificate programs and will award certificates to graduates after 6 months to a year of successful study of collision repair. Some regional community colleges offer 2-year degree programs in collision repair. Many vocational high schools offer collision repair training programs that provide solid training in automotive body repair. Students get a combination of classroom instruction and hands-on training working on damaged vehicles.

The National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) is the organization that evaluates collision repair technician training programs. They compare the content of a training program against training and testing standards developed in conjunction with the automotive industry and recommend which programs qualify for certification.

Automotive repair technology is becoming more sophisticated each year, and most employers prefer to hire applicants who have successfully completed a formal auto body repair training program or refinishing at a vocational school or community college. In many urban areas or in repair shops that are dealing with certain models of vehicles national certification is expected and required if a candidate wants to further their career past entry-level work. Most auto body shop mechanics are ASE certified. The National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) provides a standardized method of testing. Although this certification is not mandatory it is the industry credential most sought after by shops hiring new repair technicians. Collision Repair Technicians have a choice of up to four ASE Master Collision Repair and Refinish Exams. Repairers who pass at least one exam and complete 2 years of practical work experience at a repair shop earn ASE certification. Successfully completing a postsecondary program in automotive body repair may be substituted for 1 year of work experience. If a collision repair technician passes all four exams they earn the ASE Master Collision Repair and Refinish Technician designation. The materials and parts used to manufacture a vehicle are changing rapidly and becoming more complex and on-going training is needed for a repair technician to remain up-to-date on new procedures. Many repair shops provide advanced training and access to updated technical manuals and software to their repair technicians. To retain their ASE certification automotive body repairers must retake the collision repair and refinish examinations at least once every 5 years. Many vehicle and paint manufacturers provide specialized training on their products and conduct certification programs that can help a repairer advance in their career.

Collision repair technicians who are new to their profession will begin their career by assisting experienced body repairers in a variety of tasks. They will get on-the-job experience removing damaged body parts and welding and installing repaired parts. As a collision repair technicians' skills improve they would then take on more challenging tasks including alignments and replacement of damaged parts that cannot be repaired. It takes approximately 3 to 4 years of hands-on training in a repair shop to become skilled in all facets of vehicle body repair. Standards and training differ for glass installers but basic skills can be acquired in as little as 6 months. Becoming fully qualified, however, can take several years.

Auto Body Mechanic Jobs

The job market for automotive body repairers is projected to be excellent due to the increasing number of vehicles currently operating, the complexity of newer vehicles, and the growing number of retirements expected in the future. As the number of motor vehicles in use increases, the potential for more vehicles being damaged in accidents increases. Newer vehicles are manufactured of lighter materials than older cars and sustain greater damage in a collision than older, heavier models, so more repairs are needed. As vehicles are made with more complex computer and electronic operating systems less are being repaired after a collision due to the high cost of replacing these parts. These cars are often "totaled" by the insurance company and not repaired and this will temper the growth of employment for new collision repair technicians. Because most drivers are dependent on their vehicles to get to work, school, run errands, visit family, etc. automotive body repairers are less sensitive to economic downturns that might effect employment in other professions. Extensive damage must be repaired for the vehicle to run safely and to pass the inspection process required by most states so drivers are not able to put off these repairs based on economic conditions.

The majority of collision repair technicians are employed by independently owned repair shops and automotive dealers. They are paid on an incentive basis meaning they are paid a set amount for assigned tasks and how long it takes to complete these tasks. Repair shops often guarantee workers a minimum weekly salary and additional pay can be earned through additional work. Benefits often vary widely depending on the size of the shop and whether it is independently owned or part of a dealership. Paid vacation and sick time, health insurance, and 401Ks are becoming increasingly common benefits in the collision repair industry.

Resources

Schools for Automotive Body Repairers are listed in the column to the left.

Metro Areas Sorted by Total Employment for:
Automotive Body Repairers

Listed below are metro areas sorted by the total number of people employed in Automotive Body Repairers jobs , as of 2015

Source: 2015 Occupational Employment Statistics and 2014-24 Employment Projections, Bureau of Labor Statistics, BLS.gov.

     
Metro Area (Alabama) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Hoover 660 $44,130
Birmingham 660 $44,130
Mobile 390 $34,440
Montgomery 250 $39,990
Huntsville 150 $41,340
Tuscaloosa 120 $41,990
Dothan 110 $30,730
Muscle Shoals 70 $36,090
Florence 70 $36,090
Decatur 60 $38,340
Gadsden 50 $38,260
Oxford 40 $39,250
Jacksonville 40 $39,250
Anniston 40 $39,250
Opelika 30 $41,800
Auburn 30 $41,800
     
Metro Area (Alaska) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Anchorage 190 $56,630
Fairbanks N/A $57,860
     
Metro Area (Arizona) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Phoenix 1810 $41,950
Scottsdale 1810 $41,950
Mesa 1810 $41,950
Tucson 220 $43,240
Prescott 80 $56,880
Kingman 30 $58,310
Lake Havasu City 30 $58,310
Yuma N/A $52,800
     
Metro Area (Arkansas) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Conway 340 $30,300
North Little Rock 340 $30,300
Little Rock 340 $30,300
Hot Springs 40 $30,230
     
Metro Area (California) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Anaheim 4730 $38,400
Long Beach 4730 $38,400
Los Angeles 4730 $38,400
San Francisco 1460 $51,410
Hayward 1460 $51,410
Oakland 1460 $51,410
Carlsbad 1220 $37,650
San Diego 1220 $37,650
San Bernardino 1120 $37,220
Riverside 1120 $37,220
Ontario 1120 $37,220
Arcade 910 $38,580
Arden 910 $38,580
Sacramento 910 $38,580
Roseville 910 $38,580
Santa Clara 810 $50,430
Sunnyvale 810 $50,430
San Jose 810 $50,430
Fresno 340 $36,550
Thousand Oaks 320 $45,040
Oxnard 320 $45,040
Ventura 320 $45,040
Modesto 240 $37,700
Stockton 220 $45,610
Lodi 220 $45,610
Bakersfield 200 $37,270
Santa Rosa 180 $55,080
Visalia 150 $34,130
Porterville 150 $34,130
Watsonville 110 $43,930
Santa Cruz 110 $43,930
Redding 100 $42,750
Santa Maria 90 $39,030
Santa Barbara 90 $39,030
Salinas 80 $45,100
Vallejo 80 $46,980
Fairfield 80 $46,980
Napa 60 $39,820
Chico 40 $46,030
Merced 40 $49,980
Arroyo Grande 40 $54,950
Paso Robles 40 $54,950
San Luis Obispo 40 $54,950
Yuba City 30 $33,800
     
Metro Area (Colorado) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Aurora 1440 $48,030
Lakewood 1440 $48,030
Denver 1440 $48,030
Colorado Springs 410 $43,460
Fort Collins 180 $60,370
Greeley 120 $52,370
Boulder 90 $47,200
Grand Junction 50 $44,040
Pueblo 40 $34,700
     
Metro Area (Connecticut) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Hartford 650 $39,090
East Hartford 650 $39,090
West Hartford 650 $39,090
Bridgeport 400 $47,050
Norwalk 400 $47,050
Stamford 400 $47,050
New Haven 320 $43,790
Danbury 90 $51,210
Waterbury 70 $39,350
     
Metro Area (Delaware) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Dover 50 $51,990
     
Metro Area (Florida) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Miami 2590 $36,650
West Palm Beach 2590 $36,650
Fort Lauderdale 2590 $36,650
Tampa 1530 $35,730
St. Petersburg 1530 $35,730
Clearwater 1530 $35,730
Kissimmee 1190 $41,000
Orlando 1190 $41,000
Sanford 1190 $41,000
Jacksonville 910 $37,500
Fort Myers 420 $34,870
Cape Coral 420 $34,870
Deltona 360 $33,080
Ormond Beach 360 $33,080
Daytona Beach 360 $33,080
Tallahassee 260 $42,400
North Port 240 $42,840
Sarasota 240 $42,840
Bradenton 240 $42,840
Palm Bay 210 $41,060
Melbourne 210 $41,060
Titusville 210 $41,060
Lakeland 210 $44,000
Winter Haven 210 $44,000
Port St. Lucie 190 $37,630
Naples 180 $58,710
Immokalee 180 $58,710
Marco Island 180 $58,710
Brent 160 $45,640
Ferry Pass 160 $45,640
Pensacola 160 $45,640
Crestview 130 $32,280
Destin 130 $32,280
Fort Walton Beach 130 $32,280
Ocala 120 $35,910
Panama City 70 $38,450
Sebastian 60 $37,200
Vero Beach 60 $37,200
Punta Gorda 40 $44,560
Sebring 30 $23,560
Homosassa Springs 30 $39,650
Gainesville N/A $46,560
     
Metro Area (Georgia) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Roswell 2610 $44,550
Sandy Springs 2610 $44,550
Atlanta 2610 $44,550
Macon 160 $44,050
Savannah 130 $45,960
Warner Robins 120 N/A
Athens 70 $41,950
Clarke County 70 $41,950
Gainesville 60 $35,290
Brunswick 60 $37,810
Valdosta 50 $37,000
Albany 50 $53,010
Dalton 40 $37,040
Hinesville 30 $41,060
     
Metro Area (Hawaii) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Urban Honolulu 310 $44,500
Lahaina 70 $52,040
Wailuku 70 $52,040
Kahului 70 $52,040
     
Metro Area (Idaho) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Boise City 220 $39,340
Coeur d'Alene 80 $35,060
Idaho Falls 60 $40,920
Pocatello 40 $41,950
     
Metro Area (Illinois) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Peoria 240 $48,040
Rockford 180 $33,740
Champaign 110 $30,620
Urbana 110 $30,620
Bloomington 90 $41,200
Kankakee 70 $38,500
Springfield 70 $52,860
Decatur 60 $44,110
     
Metro Area (Indiana) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Anderson 1070 $50,240
Carmel 1070 $50,240
Indianapolis 1070 $50,240
Fort Wayne 180 $49,200
Goshen 140 $45,750
Elkhart 140 $45,750
La Porte 110 $44,270
Michigan City 110 $44,270
West Lafayette 70 $38,230
Lafayette 70 $38,230
Terre Haute 60 $30,300
Muncie 60 $36,870
Bloomington 60 $41,560
Columbus 30 $45,700
     
Metro Area (Iowa) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
West Des Moines 420 $39,250
Des Moines 420 $39,250
Dubuque 120 $38,070
Waterloo 110 $36,870
Cedar Falls 110 $36,870
Iowa City 90 $34,370
Ames 40 $38,690
Cedar Rapids N/A $41,420
     
Metro Area (Kansas) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Wichita 260 $48,880
Topeka 110 $55,710
Lawrence 40 $46,810
     
Metro Area (Kentucky) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Fayette 170 $38,300
Lexington 170 $38,300
Bowling Green 50 $26,700
Owensboro 40 $30,310
     
Metro Area (Louisiana) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Metairie 630 $33,560
New Orleans 630 $33,560
Baton Rouge 390 $36,640
Bossier City 250 $34,330
Shreveport 250 $34,330
Lafayette 220 $34,570
Alexandria 80 $38,130
Lake Charles 80 $40,580
Houma 70 $42,270
Thibodaux 70 $42,270
Monroe 40 $37,920
Hammond N/A $30,290
     
Metro Area (Maine) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
South Portland 300 $38,700
Portland 300 $38,700
Lewiston 70 $33,220
Auburn 70 $33,220
Bangor N/A $34,390
     
Metro Area (Maryland) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Baltimore 1050 $60,190
Towson 1050 $60,190
Columbia 1050 $60,190
Lexington Park N/A $62,910
California N/A $62,910
     
Metro Area (Massachusetts) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Barnstable Town 120 $37,920
Leominster 60 $33,960
Gardner 60 $33,960
Pittsfield 60 $41,090
New Bedford 50 $47,000
     
Metro Area (Michigan) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Warren 2600 $55,110
Detroit 2600 $55,110
Dearborn 2600 $55,110
Wyoming 600 $41,070
Grand Rapids 600 $41,070
Flint 250 $38,120
Saginaw 180 $36,700
Lansing 180 $45,770
East Lansing 180 $45,770
Portage 160 $44,020
Kalamazoo 160 $44,020
Ann Arbor 150 $58,410
Muskegon 70 $37,940
Monroe 60 $32,370
Bay City 60 $45,520
Battle Creek 50 $35,310
Jackson 50 $38,080
Benton Harbor 50 $41,720
Niles 50 $41,720
     
Metro Area (Minnesota) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Rochester 120 $38,900
Mankato 80 $38,740
North Mankato 80 $38,740
St. Cloud 80 $39,660
     
Metro Area (Mississippi) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Jackson 210 $43,010
Gulfport 80 $33,820
Pascagoula 80 $33,820
Biloxi 80 $33,820
Hattiesburg 70 $32,610
     
Metro Area (Missouri) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Springfield 250 $38,400
Joplin 100 $39,720
Jefferson City 70 $37,680
Columbia 70 $45,040
     
Metro Area (Montana) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Billings 100 $41,660
Great Falls 60 $42,480
Missoula N/A $36,320
     
Metro Area (Nebraska) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Lincoln 140 $37,420
Grand Island 60 $42,910
     
Metro Area (Nevada) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Paradise 730 $54,520
Henderson 730 $54,520
Las Vegas 730 $54,520
Reno 140 $42,290
     
Metro Area (New Hampshire) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Manchester 100 $46,490
     
Metro Area (New Jersey) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Trenton 120 $43,050
Hammonton N/A $37,820
Atlantic City N/A $37,820
     
Metro Area (New Mexico) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Albuquerque 630 $40,400
Farmington 60 $44,130
Las Cruces 50 $31,600
     
Metro Area (New York) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Cheektowaga 640 $35,300
Buffalo 640 $35,300
Niagara Falls 640 $35,300
Rochester 590 $34,650
Schenectady 460 $42,770
Albany 460 $42,770
Troy 460 $42,770
Syracuse 390 $40,330
Rome 120 $34,670
Utica 120 $34,670
Glens Falls 100 $42,710
Binghamton 80 $30,880
Ithaca 80 $38,940
Kingston 70 $42,870
Fort Drum 50 $23,510
Watertown 50 $23,510
     
Metro Area (North Carolina) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Raleigh 670 N/A
High Point 400 $49,230
Greensboro 400 $49,230
Winston 340 $29,430
Salem 340 $29,430
Fayetteville 230 N/A
Lenoir 230 $43,210
Morganton 230 $43,210
Hickory 230 $43,210
Wilmington 210 $55,230
Durham 180 $40,330
Chapel Hill 180 $40,330
Asheville 160 $44,750
Greenville 70 $43,850
Goldsboro 40 $33,180
Burlington 40 $36,790
Jacksonville 40 $38,530
     
Metro Area (North Dakota) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Bismarck 100 $44,090
     
Metro Area (Ohio) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Elyria 1030 $41,680
Cleveland 1030 $41,680
Columbus 840 $38,780
Akron 640 $36,190
Dayton 530 $42,500
Toledo 330 $35,100
Canton 240 $40,050
Massillon 240 $40,050
Springfield 60 $36,620
Lima 60 $37,440
Mansfield 40 $34,490
     
Metro Area (Oklahoma) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Oklahoma City 750 $37,530
Tulsa 420 $44,140
     
Metro Area (Oregon) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Salem 170 $52,260
Eugene 160 $40,120
Redmond 40 $39,530
Bend 40 $39,530
     
Metro Area (Pennsylvania) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Pittsburgh 1410 $38,780
Scranton 400 $33,390
Wilkes 400 $33,390
Barre 400 $33,390
Hazleton 400 $33,390
Lancaster 290 $45,630
Reading 270 $36,800
Carlisle 260 $53,080
Harrisburg 260 $53,080
Hanover 250 $38,820
York 250 $38,820
Williamsport 120 $28,440
Altoona 110 $36,320
Bloomsburg 100 $35,210
Berwick 100 $35,210
Lebanon 90 $36,540
East Stroudsburg 90 $47,810
Erie 80 $38,680
Johnstown 70 $33,960
State College 70 $40,480
     
Metro Area (Puerto Rico) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Caguas 410 $20,190
Carolina 410 $20,190
San Juan 410 $20,190
Ponce N/A $17,960
     
Metro Area (South Carolina) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Charleston 370 $43,580
North Charleston 370 $43,580
Columbia 270 $42,640
Spartanburg 230 $37,000
Mauldin 220 $36,610
Greenville 220 $36,610
Anderson 220 $36,610
Bluffton 50 $36,290
Beaufort 50 $36,290
Hilton Head Island 50 $36,290
Florence N/A $37,980
     
Metro Area (South Dakota) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Rapid City 150 $39,440
Sioux Falls 110 $38,590
     
Metro Area (Tennessee) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Murfreesboro 1380 $38,270
Franklin 1380 $38,270
Davidson 1380 $38,270
Nashville 1380 $38,270
Knoxville 370 $32,530
Johnson City 60 $31,430
Jackson 50 $30,990
Morristown 40 $33,570
Cleveland 40 $36,900
     
Metro Area (Texas) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Dallas 3450 $41,620
Arlington 3450 $41,620
Fort Worth 3450 $41,620
Sugar Land 2840 $39,810
The Woodlands 2840 $39,810
Houston 2840 $39,810
New Braunfels 860 $47,010
San Antonio 860 $47,010
Round Rock 530 $42,230
Austin 530 $42,230
El Paso 440 $38,400
Amarillo 270 $43,130
Mission 260 $31,800
McAllen 260 $31,800
Edinburg 260 $31,800
Corpus Christi 250 $37,000
Port Arthur 220 $33,560
Beaumont 220 $33,560
Odessa 110 $35,520
Lubbock 100 $50,790
Waco 90 $39,130
Tyler 90 $44,130
Harlingen 80 $27,280
Brownsville 80 $27,280
San Angelo 80 $37,300
Longview 80 $37,830
Midland 80 $41,060
Abilene 70 $37,100
Laredo 60 $40,060
Denison 40 $44,200
Sherman 40 $44,200
Bryan 30 $40,140
College Station 30 $40,140
Victoria 30 $45,680
Killeen N/A $39,880
Temple N/A $39,880
     
Metro Area (Utah) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Salt Lake City 820 $48,610
Orem 260 $38,920
Provo 260 $38,920
Clearfield 190 $39,260
Ogden 190 $39,260
     
Metro Area (Vermont) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
South Burlington 360 $44,720
Burlington 360 $44,720
     
Metro Area (Virginia) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Richmond 480 $44,370
Roanoke 210 $37,850
Blacksburg 140 $31,720
Radford 140 $31,720
Christiansburg 140 $31,720
Lynchburg 80 $37,960
Harrisonburg 80 $40,210
Charlottesville 70 $47,000
     
Metro Area (Washington) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Tacoma 1200 $49,000
Seattle 1200 $49,000
Bellevue 1200 $49,000
Spokane 270 $36,710
Spokane Valley 270 $36,710
Bellingham 80 $45,930
Tumwater 80 $49,350
Olympia 80 $49,350
Yakima 70 $24,070
Mount Vernon 70 $37,150
Anacortes 70 $37,150
Silverdale 70 $41,210
Bremerton 70 $41,210
Richland 60 $38,300
Kennewick 60 $38,300
     
Metro Area (West Virginia) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Morgantown 110 $34,520
Charleston N/A $32,830
     
Metro Area (Wisconsin) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Waukesha 750 $37,100
West Allis 750 $37,100
Milwaukee 750 $37,100
Madison 330 $36,150
Green Bay 210 $39,780
Appleton 190 $37,030
Neenah 150 $38,350
Oshkosh 150 $38,350
Eau Claire 140 $34,960
Sheboygan 80 $38,410
Racine 70 $35,960
Beloit 70 $37,770
Janesville 70 $37,770
Wausau 60 $34,490
Fond du Lac 50 $34,340
     
Metro Area (Wyoming) Total Employment Annual Median Salary
Casper 60 $36,850

Most Popular Industries for :
Automotive Body Repairers

Industries representing at least 1% of total jobs for the occupation.

Source: 2015 Occupational Employment Statistics and 2014-24 Employment Projections, Bureau of Labor Statistics, BLS.gov.

Industry Jobs Percent Annual Median Salary
Maintenance And Repair 100,330 68% $36,190
Auto And Auto Parts Dealers 34,430 23% $38,740
Durable Goods Wholesale 3,460 2% $33,290
Automotive And Vehicle Manufacturing 1,830 1% $54,410
These schools offer particularly quick info upon request, and we have written detailed profiles for each (click school names to see the profiles). Request info from multiple schools, by clicking the Request Info links.
 
Results:  7
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  • Collision Repair
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Sacramento
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Programs
  • Small Engine Repair
  • Auto Repair Technician
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  • Collision Repair
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  • At UTI, you won’t just train for a career. You’ll train for success. The hands-on training and high-tech skills you’ll get at UTI will put you on the fast track to a rewarding career as a professional technician.

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Houston
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Programs
  • Auto Mechanics
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Programs
  • BS in Aeronautics
  • Liberty University provides a world-class education with a solid Christian foundation, equipping men and women with the values, knowledge, and skills essential for success in every aspect of life.

Programs
  • Automotive Technician (9-Month Diploma Program)
  • At UEI College, we want you to succeed. We’re like a family and we want you to be a part of it.

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Gardena
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Programs
  • Aviation Maintenance Technician
  • Aviation Maintenance Technical Engineer
  • Aviation Institute of Maintenance schools are distinguished institutes committed to the education and personal enrichment of each student interested in the Aviation Industry.

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Las Vegas
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CityTownInfo Career and College Resources

We have some additional detailed pages at the state level for Automotive Body Repairers.

Numbers in parentheses are counts of relevant campus-based schools in the state; online schools may also be available.

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