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Overview

Introduction to New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, located at the mouth of the Mississippi River in southern Louisiana, is the largest city in the state and one of the South's commercial centers. It's a city steeped in a dark history as rich as its famous gumbo and crawfish etouffe. The city was founded in 1718 and named for the regent of France, Philippe II, duc d'Orleans. The area was alternately under French and Spanish rule until being sold to the US by France as part of the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. New Orleans was the site of battles during the War of 1812 and the Civil War. The blending of French, Spanish and African influences created the Creole society and cuisine for which New Orleans is famous. The city's Cajuns are descendants of French immigrants who originally settled in Canada.

In recent years, the city's economy has been dominated by the petrochemical, aluminum and food processing industries, as well as tourism. These industries, along with the city itself, were severely impacted on August 29, 2005, when Hurricane Katrina, a powerful Category 3 hurricane whose storm surge was equivalent to that of a Category 5, struck the Gulf Coast causing 80 percent of the city to become flooded and more than 150,000 properties in New Orleans to be damaged or destroyed. In some portions of the city, the water remained for several weeks, compounding the damaging effects to communications, health, civil order, etc., and severely hampering reconstruction efforts. Although the damage was extensive and widespread, there were pockets of the city that completely escaped flooding and its catastrophic effects, including the historic and legendary French Quarter district. Other areas, most particularly parts of the city's 9th Ward, were not so fortunate. The Louisiana Superdome, itself having sustained significant damage, was used as a necessary refuge for thousands of New Orleans residents who had nowhere else to go.

Businesses, many of which were forced to come up with creative workarounds, began to reopen soon after the catastrophe. Some months after the storm, many restaurants were serving food and drink in disposable plates and cups due to the shortage of dishwashers. Outdoor grilling on the sidewalks was not uncommon. Despite the tragedy and the slow pace of the ongoing recovery, New Orleans was not deterred from holding a 2006 version of its legendary Mardi Gras, a March tradition since 1827 featuring festive floats, entertainment and partying. The same was true for the city's annual Jazz & Heritage Festival, which went on as usual and drew over 45 of the biggest names in music who gave inspired performances to appreciative audiences. On September 25, 2006, city residents, some of whom set up televisions outside the government-issued trailers that became their homes, were able to celebrate the return of football to the newly-restored Superdome when the New Orleans Saints played an NFL Monday Night game there.

New Orleans Culture, Sports, and Leisure

Today, recovery is ongoing and understandably but frustratingly slow. There are still many unresolved aspects to the city and to many of its citizens and establishments. Despite the uncertainty, the city is showing definite signs of at least a partial return to the vibrancy it once had. The restoration of the 70,000-seat Superdome has provided a big boost to the city's sports environment, giving a home back to the NFL's Saints (who split their 2005-2006 home games between San Antonio and Baton Rouge) and a planned return of college football's Sugar Bowl to New Orleans. After playing some of their 2005-2006 home games at the Ford Center in Oklahoma City and others at the Pete Maravich Center on the LSU campus in Baton Rouge, the NBA's Hornets will return at least partially to The New Orleans Arena for the 2006-2007 season, where they will play six of their home games. Their remaining 35 home games will take place at the Ford Center. In actuality, the Arena (located next door to the Superdome) wasn't nearly as damaged by the storm as the Superdome, but problems with the market, as opposed to the facility, have caused the Hornets (now officially dubbed the "New Orleans/Oklahoma City Hornets") to schedule most of their games outside of New Orleans. Minor league baseball, however, is still alive and well in New Orleans. The New Orleans Zephyrs, an AAA-affiliate of the Washington Nationals (beginning in 2007 they will switch allegiance to the New York Mets) play at Zephyr Field in Metairie, a nearby suburb.

Nightlife in New Orleans is recovering too. Known as "The Big Easy" for its easy-going lifestyle and morals that are anything but strict, New Orleans has traditionally been known for having a nightlife second to none, housing bars and drinking establishments many of which are located on the famous Bourbon Street in the French Quarter. Over the years, visitors to this area have grown accustomed to walking through the street with an alcoholic beverage in hand, sampling first rate jazz, blues and other types of music through all hours of the night. Fortunately, this part of the city sustained a relatively small amount of damage from Katrina, and reconstruction to this area has been easy and quick. An average visitor to the French Quarter today may find that his or her mental image of New Orleans remains intact, despite the drastic changes to other less-visited parts of the city. The motto, "Laissez Les Bon Temps Roulez," Let the Good Times Roll, can still be heard on the streets and is a testament to the resiliency and spirit of the city and its people.

People

Total Population 376,738
Male Share of the Population 47.8%
Female Share of the Population 52.2%
Senior Citizens 11.8%
Employed Population 16+ 167,846
Age of the Population 35

Families

% of people married 30%
Average household size 2

Education and Earnings

Population % with Bachelor Degree or Higher 35.3%
Median Earnings25+ $32,097
Median Earnings Without High School Qualification $16,244
Median Earnings With High School Degree $22,263

Wealth

Median Family Income $49,948
% Above Poverty Level 73%
% Below Poverty Level 27%

Commute & Sprawl

Average Commute Time 23 minutes
% Working from Home 3.7%
% Walking and Biking to Work 7.8%
% Using Public Transportation 7.8%

Housing

People Living Alone 42%
Median Gross Rent $924
Median House Value $192,400

Ancestry

Other(often includes Hispanic and African American) 62.7%
US/American 0%
English 4.1%
Irish 6%

Source: American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau, 2015, www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/.

New Orleans Almanac

Category Value
County Orleans
Metro Area New Orleans
Standard Zip Codes 70112, 70113, 70114, 70115, 70116, 70117, 70118, 70119, 70121, 70122, 70123, 70124, 70125, 70126, 70127, 70128, 70129, 70130, 70131, 70139, 70140, 70145, 70146, 70149, 70163, 70170
P.O. Box Zip Codes 70141, 70150, 70151, 70152, 70153, 70156, 70157, 70158, 70160, 70161, 70172, 70174, 70175, 70176, 70177, 70178, 70179, 70181, 70182, 70183, 70184, 70185, 70186, 70187, 70189, 70190
Company Zip Codes 70142, 70143, 70148, 70154, 70159, 70162, 70164, 70165, 70166, 70167, 70195
Phone Area Codes 504
Time Zone Central (-6 hours from GMT)
Daylight Savings The city observes Daylight Saving Time.
Latitude 29.954
Longitude -90.075

New Orleans Climate

Nearest Weather Stations

Notes:

  • Temp ranges are avg daily min and max for the month
  • Precipitation is rainfall (and rainfall equiv of snowfall)

Station NEW ORLEANS AUDUBON
Distance 4.4 miles
Jan Temp 45 to 63 F
Apr Temp 60 to 79 F
Jul Temp 75 to 92 F
Oct Temp 62 to 81 F
Annual Precip 63.7 inches
Station NEW ORLEANS CALLENDER
Distance 10.2 miles
Jan Temp 43 to 62 F
Apr Temp 58 to 77 F
Jul Temp 74 to 91 F
Oct Temp 60 to 79 F
Annual Precip 65.1 inches
Station ST BERNARD
Distance 15.7 miles
Jan Temp 43 to 62 F
Apr Temp 59 to 77 F
Jul Temp 74 to 90 F
Oct Temp 60 to 78 F
Annual Precip 62.8 inches

Neighborhood and Nearby Area Names

According to the US Postal Service, New Orleans, its neighborhoods, and/or surrounding areas are also referred to as:

Algiers (70114)

Broadmoor (70125)

Bywater (70117)

Carrollton (70118)

Chef Menteur (70126)

Custom House (70116)

Gentilly (70122)

Lafayette Square (70130)

Shrewsbury (70121)

Note that not all alternate names are acceptable for use in US Post Office addresses.

Nearby Cities and Towns

Location Population Median Family Income
Gretna 17,827 $47,218
Harahan 9,328 $83,241
Kenner 66,993 $62,204
Metairie 142,715 $72,843
Westwego 8,564 $38,790

Source: American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau, 2015, www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/.

New Orleans Public Libraries

Library
New Orleans Public Library
219 LOYOLA AVENUE
New Orleans, Louisiana
(504) 596-2600
Library Web Site

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More Information for Librarians

New Orleans Hospitals

TULANE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL
(Proprietary)
1415 TULANE AVE
(504) 988-5800
Emergency Service: Yes

MEDICAL CENTER OF LOUISIANA AT N O
(Government - State)
2021 PERDIDO ST 4TH FLOOR
(504) 903-0289
Emergency Service: Yes

TOURO INFIRMARY
(Voluntary non-profit - Private)
1401 FOUCHER STREET
(504) 897-8246
Emergency Service: Yes

OCHSNER BAPTIST MEDICAL CENTER LLC
(Voluntary non-profit - Private)
2700 NAPOLEON AVENUE
(504) 899-9311
Emergency Service: Yes

LINDY BOGGS MEDICAL CENTER
(Proprietary)
301 NORTH JEFFERSON DAVIS PKWY
(504) 483-5103
Emergency Service: Yes

OCHSNER FOUNDATION HOSPITAL
(Voluntary non-profit - Private)
1516 JEFFERSON HWY
(504) 828-3000
Emergency Service: Yes

METHODIST HOSPITAL
(Voluntary non-profit - Private)
5620 READ BOULEVARD
(504) 244-5474
Emergency Service: Yes

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Programs
  • Massage Therapy - Diploma
  • Clinical Medical Assisting - Diploma
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Blue Cliff College was founded in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1987 with the goal of becoming one of the most respected and innovative Massage Therapy training centers in the nation. In June of 1989, the College in Louisiana received its Proprietary School License from the state. In 1998, the Continuing Education College was proud to receive accreditation from the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC). The Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC) is a recognized accrediting agency by the US Department of Education.

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Houma
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Programs
  • Diesel Technology
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  • Encompasses the Lincoln Tech, Lincoln Culinary Institute, and Lincoln College of New England brands.
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  • First Lincoln Tech campus opened in 1946; now 30 campuses in 15 states across the United States.
  • Campuses are accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS), Accrediting Commission of Career Schools (ACCSC), Accrediting Bureau of Health Education Schools (ABHES), and New England Association of Schools and Colleges – Commission on Institutions of Higher Education (NEASC)
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New Orleans High Schools

(Sorted by Number of Students)

MARION ABRAMSON SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
5552 READ BOULEVARD
504-243-5701
A Title I School.
Serves 1,589 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 15.3

JOHN F. KENNEDY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
5700 WISNER BOULEVARD
504-286-2680
A Title I School.
Serves 1,470 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 19.3

WARREN EASTON FUNDAMENTAL SR HIGH SCHOOL
3019 CANAL STREET
504-827-4541
A Title I School.
Serves 1,362 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 17.7

MCMAIN MAGNET SECONDARY SCHOOL
5712 SOUTH CLAIBORNE AVENUE
504-862-5117
A Magnet School.
A Title I School.
Serves 1,259 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 19.1

JOHN MCDONOGH SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
2426 ESPLANADE AVENUE
504-827-4575
A Title I School.
Serves 1,247 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 16

SARAH TOWLES REED SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
5316 MICHOUD BOULEVARD
504-254-8655
A Title I School.
Serves 1,180 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 15.1

EDNA KARR MAGNET SCHOOL
3332 HUNTLEE DRIVE
504-398-7115
A Magnet School.
Serves 1,086 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 18.9

ALCEE FORTIER HIGH SCHOOL
5624 FRERET STREET
504-862-5140
A Title I School.
Serves 1,078 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 16.1

MCDONOGH #35 SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
1331 KERLEREC STREET
504-942-3592
A Magnet School.
A Title I School.
Serves 1,018 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 20.4

O. P. WALKER SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
2832 GENERAL MEYER AVENUE
504-363-1072
A Title I School.
Serves 1,007 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 16.8

FREDRICK A. DOUGLASS HIGH SCHOOL
3820 SAINT CLAUDE AVENUE
504-942-3570
A Title I School.
Serves 934 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 16.7

WALTER L. COHEN HIGH SCHOOL
3520 DRYADES STREET
504-896-4008
A Title I School.
Serves 857 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 17.9

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
2001 LEON C. SIMON DRIVE
504-286-2600
A Magnet School.
Serves 855 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 13.2

G. W. CARVER HIGH SCHOOL
3059 HIGGINS BOULEVARD
504-942-1775
A Title I School.
Serves 845 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 13.2

RABOUIN CAREER MAGNET HIGH SCHOOL
727 CARONDELET STREET
504-592-8383
A Title I School.
Serves 705 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 17.2

LAWLESS HIGH SCHOOL
5300 LAW STREET
504-942-3602
A Title I School.
Serves 606 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 12.6

BOOKER T. WASHINGTON SCHOOL
1201 SOUTH ROMAN STREET
504-592-8580
A Title I School.
Serves 577 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 9.9

L.B. LANDRY HIGH SCHOOL
1200 L B LANDRY AVENUE
504-363-1040
A Title I School.
Serves 540 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 12.3

JOSEPH S. CLARK SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
1301 NORTH DERBIGNY STREET
504-827-4539
A Title I School.
Serves 481 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 15

JUVENILE ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL
850 SOUTH WHITE STREET
504-827-8570
A Non-traditional School
Serves 109 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 18.2

URBAN LEAGUE STREET ACADEMY
1300 MILTON STREET
504-286-2031
A Non-traditional School
A Title I School.
Serves 97 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 19.4

EAST NEW ORLEANS EDUCATIONAL CENTER
2521 MARAIS STREET
504-942-7675
A Non-traditional School
A Title I School.
Serves 64 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 4.3

YOUTH STUDY CENTER
1100 MILTON STREET
504-282-4727
A Non-traditional School
Serves 62 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 12.4

N. O. PUBLIC SCHOOLS ALTERNATIVE HIGH SCHOOL
709 PARK BOULEVARD
504-363-1018
A Non-traditional School
A Title I School.
Serves 48 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 4.4

NEW ORLEANS ADOLESCENT HOSPITAL
210 STATE STREET
504-897-4605
A Special Education School
A Title I School.
Serves 30 students.
Student/teacher ratio: 5

NEW ORLEANS SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS HS
980 NAVARRE AVENUE
504-483-4145
A Non-traditional School

NEW ORLEANS CENTER FOR CREATIVE ARTS
2800 CHARTRES STREET
504-940-2787
A Non-traditional School
A Magnet School.

NEW ORLEANS CENTER FOR HEALTH CAREERS
2009 PALMYRA STREET
504-592-8500
A Vocational School

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Historic New Orleans

photo

U.S. Custom House between 1890 and 1899

Select a photo to view (Source):

U.S. Custom House between 1890 and 1899

Interior (U.S. Custom House) c1900, c1901.

Christ Church between 1890 and 1901

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