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Arbitrators

Arbitrators prevent and solve disputes between organizations and people. An arbitrator evaluates evidence and applies policies, laws and regulations in order to make a decision. Arbiters assist in negotiations. The participants that hire the services of an arbitrator are required to agree to follow the arbitrators final decision. Their services are an alternative to using law suits for settling disputes.

Arbitrators are typically lawyers or businesspersons that have expertise in a specific field. Some specialize in the field of labor arbitration and bind management and labor to specific terms and conditions of a labor contract.

Mediators help people resolve disputes. Mediators may represent one or both parties in a dispute. Mediators represent businesses, labor unions, government and people involved in divorce and custody battles. They provide suggestions, however the two parties make the final decision.

Responsibilities

  • Talk to people in order to learn the needs, concerns and interests of the participants
  • Collect information and evidence in order to understand the issues and possible outcomes
  • They should not favor one participant over the other participant
  • Make sure everyone involved understands the arbitration process
  • Coordinate meetings and hearings
  • Study similar disputes in order to make a decision
  • Interview witnesses
  • Determine if exceptions and evidence will be allowed

Job Characteristics

They should have strong morals and ethics. They also need good speaking and writing skills. Since they make decisions that are legally binding they need to be accurate in their work. Arbiters deal with all types of people.

Employment Outlook

The projected job growth is expected to be average for arbitrators from 2006 to 2016. Law firms will be one of the fastest growing sectors for arbitrators. A lot of people choose to settle out of court since arbitration typically costs less which increases the demand for arbiters. In addition, the median annual earnings for arbitrators, mediators and conciliators in 2008 was $50,650.

Education, Certification, and Licensing

Typically, arbitrators have earned a bachelor's degree or higher. Bachelor's degrees in business, public policy and social work are beneficial. Law degrees and master's degrees in conflict resolution are useful in the profession.

Numerous universities provide a master's degree in arbitration and conflict resolution. Professional associations provide specific training. Experience in law and business can help prepare a candidate for an arbitrator career.

Local and state governments typically require a bachelor's degree. Each state has its own requirements. Some states require an arbitrator to be an experienced lawyer.

Helpful courses for the occupation are law studies, consumer law, business law, public speaking and psychology.

Resources

Major Employers

The top job providers are local and state government agencies, law offices, and political, labor and business organizations.

Schools for Arbitrators And Mediators are listed in the Browse Schools Section.

Arbitrators and Mediators Skills

Below are the skills needed to be arbitrators and mediators according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Skill NameImportanceCompetence
Negotiation4.625
Active Listening4.54.88
Speaking4.254.5
Critical Thinking4.124.62
Persuasion4.124.62

Arbitrators and Mediators Abilities

Below are the abilities needed to be arbitrators and mediators according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Ability NameImportanceCompetence
Deductive Reasoning44.25
Inductive Reasoning44.12
Oral Comprehension45
Oral Expression45
Speech Clarity43.75

Arbitrators and Mediators Knowledge

Below are the knowledge areas needed to be arbitrators and mediators according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Knowledge AreaImportanceCompetence
English Language4.214.68
Psychology3.894.48
Law and Government3.714.39
Customer and Personal Service3.183.79
Sociology and Anthropology2.933.67

Arbitrators and Mediators Work activities

Below are the work activities involved in being arbitrators and mediators according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest).

   
Work ActivityImportanceCompetence
Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others4.856.37
Getting Information4.715.75
Thinking Creatively4.144.64
Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships45.18
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events3.964.82

Arbitrators and Mediators Work styles

Below are the work styles involved in being arbitrators and mediators according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest).

   
Work StyleImportance
Self Control4.89
Integrity4.86
Stress Tolerance4.68
Dependability4.61
Attention to Detail4.5

Metro Areas Sorted by Total Employment for
Arbitrators and Mediators

Listed below are the 10 largest metro areas based on the total number of people employed in Arbitrators and Mediators jobs , as of 2017

   
Metro AreaTotal EmploymentAnnual Mean Salary
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell190 $76,190
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land150 $81,650
San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward120 $115,520
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale110 $58,480
Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue110 $70,040
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington90 $67,430
Albany-Schenectady-Troy90 $80,700
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas80 $36,800
Pittsburgh80 $69,490
San Diego-Carlsbad80 $117,780

Compare Total Employment & Salaries for Arbitrators

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Employment
Salary

Total employment and salary for professions similar to arbitrators

Source : 2017 Occupational Employment Statistics and 2016-26 Employment Projections, Bureau of Labor Statistics, BLS.gov; O*NET® 23.1 Database, O*NET OnLine, National Center for O*NET Development, Employment & Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, onetonline.org

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We have some additional detailed pages at the state level for Arbitrators and Mediators.

Numbers in parentheses are counts of relevant campus-based schools in the state; online schools may also be available.