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Delivery Truck Drivers picture    Delivery Truck Drivers image

Delivery Truck Drivers

Delivery truck drivers deliver packages and deliver or pick up merchandise with a truck or a van, typically within a specified area. Most drivers have regular routes, however some delivery drivers have different routs each day. Some delivery truck drivers load and unload trucks. Most drivers work for companies that deliver their own products, such as department stores or for delivery companies and trucking firms. Some delivery truck drivers are self-employed and some work part-time.

Light or delivery services truck drivers, also known as pick-up and delivery or P&D drivers, often transport packages from distribution centers to homes and businesses. Drivers that work for package delivery companies may just have a single load and make numerous deliveries during a given day, whereas some drivers may have several loads during a given day. While making deliveries, they might take payments for cash-on-delivery shipments and deal with paperwork, including delivery conformations and receipts.

Driver/sales workers or route drivers have sales duties. They may encourage a store manager to increase their inventory or to sell new products to their customers. They may also arrange products on shelves in a grocery store. Drivers/sales workers may also be required to solicit new customers along their routes.

Sample job titles are delivery driver, bulk delivery driver, package delivery driver and route driver.

Responsibilities

  • Adhere to established traffic and transportation procedures and obey traffic laws
  • Verify the contents being transported with shipping papers
  • Inspect and maintain vehicle equipment and supplies
  • Report vehicle mechanical problems
  • Provide bills and receipts and collect payments for items delivered or loaded
  • Maintain records of cargo, vehicle logs and billing statements
  • Load and unload vans and trucks
  • Report delays, accidents and other types of traffic and transportation situations

Job Characteristics

Local truck drivers often work more than 50 hours per week. Drivers that deliver food for produce markets, grocery chains and bakeries often work late at night or early in the morning. A delivery truck driver job can be tiring due to driving for many hours at a time and loading and unloading cargo. Local truck drivers typically return home in the evenings.

Employment Outlook

The Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasts a 4 percent employment growth for light or delivery services truck drivers which is slower than average. The Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasts a 4 percent employment growth for driver/sales workers which is slower than average. In addition, The median hourly wage for light or delivery services truck drivers in 2008 was $13.27.

Education, Certification, and Licensing

Most delivery truck driver jobs require some high school education along with a valid driver's license and a clean driving record. Courses in driver education and auto mechanics can be beneficial. Many jobs driving small trucks require a small amount of training. Drivers/sales workers are provided training regarding the products their company sells.

Those seeking to drive heavy trucks or tractor trailers or vehicles transporting hazardous materials or oversize loads need a commercial driver's license (CDL). Many private and public vocational schools provide training for a commercial driver's license.

The Professional Truck Driver Institute certifies driver-training courses provided by truck training schools that are able to meet industry standards and Federal Highway Administration guidelines for the training of tractor-trailer drivers.

The standards for truck drivers are governed by Federal and State regulations. Drivers are required to comply with all Federal regulations and any State regulations that are in excess of Federal requirements when under a particular state's jurisdiction. Truck driver's are required to have a license issued by the state where they live. A regular driver's license is sufficient in many states for driving light trucks and vans.

Resources

Major Employers

The top employers are retail firms, wholesale companies, manufacturing firms, delivery companies, trucking companies, the Federal government, state governments, municipalities and the U.S. Postal Service.

Schools for Delivery Truck Drivers are listed in the Browse Schools Section.

Delivery Truck Drivers Skills

Below are the skills needed to be delivery truck drivers according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Skill NameImportanceCompetence
Operation and Control3.253
Active Listening3.122.88
Speaking3.122.75
Monitoring32.5
Reading Comprehension32.75

Delivery Truck Drivers Abilities

Below are the abilities needed to be delivery truck drivers according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Ability NameImportanceCompetence
Far Vision3.623.38
Multilimb Coordination3.53
Spatial Orientation3.53.12
Static Strength3.383.62
Near Vision3.253.12

Delivery Truck Drivers Knowledge

Below are the knowledge areas needed to be delivery truck drivers according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Knowledge AreaImportanceCompetence
Customer and Personal Service3.694.12
Transportation3.583.34
Law and Government3.362.68
English Language2.982.59
Public Safety and Security2.822.75

Delivery Truck Drivers Work activities

Below are the work activities involved in being delivery truck drivers according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest).

   
Work ActivityImportanceCompetence
Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment4.223.59
Getting Information4.133.65
Handling and Moving Objects3.844.92
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates3.733.86
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events3.693.87

Delivery Truck Drivers Work styles

Below are the work styles involved in being delivery truck drivers according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest).

   
Work StyleImportance
Dependability4.42
Cooperation4.07
Attention to Detail4.06
Integrity4.03
Self Control3.85

Metro Areas Sorted by Total Employment for
Delivery Truck Drivers

Listed below are the 10 largest metro areas based on the total number of people employed in Delivery Truck Drivers jobs , as of 2017

   
Metro AreaTotal EmploymentAnnual Mean Salary
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim37,440 $38,420
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington20,900 $37,390
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach19,020 $34,060
San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward16,060 $41,030
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell15,510 $38,180
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land14,720 $35,490
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario12,060 $39,760
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale11,460 $38,070
Detroit-Warren-Dearborn11,370 $36,420
Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue11,130 $40,490

Compare Total Employment & Salaries for Delivery Truck Drivers

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Total employment and salary for professions similar to delivery truck drivers

Source : 2017 Occupational Employment Statistics and 2016-26 Employment Projections, Bureau of Labor Statistics, BLS.gov; O*NET® 23.1 Database, O*NET OnLine, National Center for O*NET Development, Employment & Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, onetonline.org

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We have some additional detailed pages at the state level for Delivery Truck Drivers.

Numbers in parentheses are counts of relevant campus-based schools in the state; online schools may also be available.