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Dietetic Technicians

Dietetic technicians work under the supervision of a registered dietitian. They help plan and implement nutritional programs and services in facilities such as schools, nursing homes and hospitals. They counsel and educate individuals and community groups regarding proper nutrition. They develop and prepare nutritional recipes for people that have special dietary needs. Some Dietetic technicians specialize in an area such as food service management or nutritional care.

Dietetic technicians involved with food service management plan meals and menus, oversee the production of meals and ensure quality control and safety standards are being followed. They also order food and supplies.

Nutritional care technicians interview patients and review their medical histories in order to determine their nutritional needs. They help people plan meals that comply with their prescribed diet and they help people stay within their food budget.

Some common job titles are dietary aide, diet clerk, certified dietary manager, diet technician registered, clinical dietetic technician, dietary manager, nutrition technician.

Responsibilities

  • Obtain and evaluate an individual's dietary history in order to develop a nutritional program
  • Assist dietitians and nutritionists with food service supervising and planning
  • Monitor patient food intake and report dietary problems and progress to dietician
  • Evaluate recipes and menus and test new products
  • Develop menus and diets
  • Prepare meals and determine group food quantities
  • Help dietitians research food, nutrition and food service systems
  • Determine beverage and food costs and help with implementing cost control procedures

Job Characteristics

Many dietetic technicians work in clean, well-ventilated settings, however some of these technicians work in hot, congested kitchens. They usually work 40 hours a week. Some dietetic technicians have to work during the weekends and on holidays.

Employment Outlook

The employment growth for dietetic technicians is projected to be faster than the average for all occupations from 2008 to 2018. Demand for dietetic technicians will increase due to an increasing emphasis on disease prevention via improved diets and the needs of an aging population and also from an increasing emphasis on health education. In addition, the median annual earnings for dietetic technicians in 2008 was $26,080.

Education, Certification, and Licensing

The majority of employers seek candidates that have an associate degree from a community college or a vocational school that has been approved by the American Dietetic Association. Many of these programs include practical experience in a food service facility. These programs blend classroom learning with practical experience. In addition, an individual needs to pass a national examination provided by the Commission on Dietetic Registration in order to become certified and registered.

Resources

Major Employers

The primary employers are hospitals, school systems, prisons, nursing homes, colleges and universities, home health agencies, long term care facilities, community health centers, food related industries, and research facilities.

Schools for Dietetic Technicians are listed in the Browse Schools Section.

Dietetic Technicians Skills

Below are the skills needed to be dietetic technicians according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Skill NameImportanceCompetence
Reading Comprehension3.253.25
Speaking3.253
Monitoring3.253.5
Service Orientation3.123.5
Critical Thinking3.123.25

Dietetic Technicians Abilities

Below are the abilities needed to be dietetic technicians according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Ability NameImportanceCompetence
Oral Comprehension3.623.75
Oral Expression3.53.88
Deductive Reasoning3.53.25
Problem Sensitivity3.383.12
Near Vision3.253.88

Dietetic Technicians Knowledge

Below are the knowledge areas needed to be dietetic technicians according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Knowledge AreaImportanceCompetence
Food Production3.652.84
English Language3.412.75
Public Safety and Security3.22.76
Customer and Personal Service3.13.19
Administration and Management2.882.25

Dietetic Technicians Work activities

Below are the work activities involved in being dietetic technicians according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest).

   
Work ActivityImportanceCompetence
Assisting and Caring for Others4.34.61
Making Decisions and Solving Problems4.183.58
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates4.074.21
Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings3.964.01
Getting Information3.954.23

Dietetic Technicians Work styles

Below are the work styles involved in being dietetic technicians according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest).

   
Work StyleImportance
Dependability4.31
Concern for Others4.13
Integrity4.13
Cooperation4.12
Self Control3.98

Metro Areas Sorted by Total Employment for
Dietetic Technicians

Listed below are the 10 largest metro areas based on the total number of people employed in Dietetic Technicians jobs , as of 2017

   
Metro AreaTotal EmploymentAnnual Mean Salary
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim1,690 $32,320
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale1,060 $27,740
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land800 $27,240
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington700 $26,060
San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward610 $42,560
Cleveland-Elyria530 $32,740
Salt Lake City500 $26,850
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario390 $31,750
Grand Rapids-Wyoming360 $23,620
San Diego-Carlsbad340 $31,310

Compare Total Employment & Salaries for Dietetic Technicians

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Employment
Salary

Total employment and salary for professions similar to dietetic technicians

Source : 2017 Occupational Employment Statistics and 2016-26 Employment Projections, Bureau of Labor Statistics, BLS.gov; O*NET® 22.1 Database, O*NET OnLine, National Center for O*NET Development, Employment & Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, onetonline.org

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We have some additional detailed pages at the state level for Dietetic Technicians.

Numbers in parentheses are counts of relevant campus-based schools in the state; online schools may also be available.