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Fire Inspectors And Investigators picture    Fire Inspectors And Investigators image

Fire Inspectors

Fire inspectors inspect structures and equipment to make sure they adhere to state and local fire codes. They may also collaborate with planners and developers to review and approve plans for new structures and to inspect buildings that are being constructed. Fire inspectors identify and review with property owners the corrective actions required to bring structures into compliance with fire codes, laws, regulations and standards.

Some sample job titles include fire marshal, fire safety inspector, fire prevention inspector, state fire marshal, fire official and deputy fire marshal.

Responsibilities

  • Provide and explain fire prevention information and fire code requirements to contractors, architects, developers, engineers, fire service personnel and the general public
  • Inspect structures for fire code violations and hazardous conditions
  • Perform fire code compliance to make sure corrective actions have been taken in cases where violations were discovered
  • Attend training classes in order to stay current with fire safety and prevention issues and fire fighting procedures
  • Write reports regarding fire inspections performed, fire code violations and corrective recommendations offered
  • Inspect and test fire detection systems and fire protection systems to ensure they have been installed in accordance with applicable codes, laws, regulations, ordinances and standards
  • Develop or review fire exit plans
  • Perform inspection and acceptance testing of newly installed fire protection systems

Job Characteristics

They spend a lot of their time at sites performing inspections. They should be well organized and detailed oriented. A fire inspector also needs good interpersonal and communication skills.

Employment Outlook

The Bureau of Labor Statistics expects the employment growth of fire inspectors to be as fast as the average for all occupations. The employment of fire inspectors should grow along with the population. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, those seeking fire inspector jobs should expect keen competition. In addition, the median annual earnings in 2008 for fire inspectors was $53,030.

Education, Certification, and Licensing

Most fire inspectors have acquired experience in fire suppression and have a high school diploma. They receive on-the-job training or attend training academies.

Resources

Major Employers

The primary employers are local governments and state governments.

Schools for Fire Inspectors And Investigators are listed in the Browse Schools Section.

Fire Inspectors and Investigators Skills

Below are the skills needed to be fire inspectors and investigators according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Skill NameImportanceCompetence
Critical Thinking3.884
Active Listening3.884
Judgment and Decision Making3.753.88
Speaking3.623.88
Quality Control Analysis3.623.75

Fire Inspectors and Investigators Abilities

Below are the abilities needed to be fire inspectors and investigators according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Ability NameImportanceCompetence
Problem Sensitivity4.124.5
Flexibility of Closure44
Oral Expression3.884
Near Vision3.884
Inductive Reasoning3.884

Fire Inspectors and Investigators Knowledge

Below are the knowledge areas needed to be fire inspectors and investigators according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Knowledge AreaImportanceCompetence
Public Safety and Security4.694.85
Customer and Personal Service4.25.78
Law and Government4.033.94
Building and Construction44.15
English Language3.723.96

Fire Inspectors and Investigators Work activities

Below are the work activities involved in being fire inspectors and investigators according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest).

   
Work ActivityImportanceCompetence
Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards4.624.87
Performing for or Working Directly with the Public4.435.09
Documenting/Recording Information4.433.96
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge4.395.08
Communicating with Persons Outside Organization4.375.12

Fire Inspectors and Investigators Work styles

Below are the work styles involved in being fire inspectors and investigators according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest).

   
Work StyleImportance
Integrity4.65
Cooperation4.42
Dependability4.3
Attention to Detail4.3
Initiative4.17

Metro Areas Sorted by Total Employment for
Fire Inspectors and Investigators

Listed below are the 10 largest metro areas based on the total number of people employed in Fire Inspectors and Investigators jobs , as of 2017

   
Metro AreaTotal EmploymentAnnual Mean Salary
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington410 $68,180
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach280 $74,990
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim270 $102,290
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell230 $66,980
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land230 $68,200
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale150 $71,730
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin130 $40,280
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson130 $62,560
Detroit-Warren-Dearborn130 $68,840
San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward120 $119,070

Compare Total Employment & Salaries for Fire Inspectors

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Total employment and salary for professions similar to fire inspectors

Source : 2017 Occupational Employment Statistics and 2016-26 Employment Projections, Bureau of Labor Statistics, BLS.gov; O*NET® 22.1 Database, O*NET OnLine, National Center for O*NET Development, Employment & Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, onetonline.org

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We have some additional detailed pages at the state level for Fire Inspectors and Investigators.

Numbers in parentheses are counts of relevant campus-based schools in the state; online schools may also be available.