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Individuals who are employed in the forest and conservation field perform a variety of functions relating to the conservation of timberlands and maintenance of forest facilities such as roads and campsites. Forest and conservation technicians plant and remove trees, compile data characterizing forest tracts, and provide technical assistance on conservation of natural resources. These tasks are all performed under the supervision of a forester, who is responsible for the overall management of a particular parcel of forested land.

Forest And Conservation Workers picture    Forest And Conservation Workers image

Forest and Conservation Programs

Generally, forest and conservation workers need a high school diploma. Since many forest worker positions provide only seasonal employment during the warm weather periods, students are often employed to perform short-term labor intensive tasks.

The Society of American Foresters accredits dozens of associate degree programs in forest technology. These forest and conservation programs are offered at technical and community colleges and a number of them are designed to provide easy transfer to a 4-year college or university. Technician training is generally offered at technical institutes although the type of training typically includes less theory than that offered at technical or community colleges.

The length of programs at technical institutes varies, although certificate programs lasting one year and associate degree programs lasting two years are most common. Some schools offer cooperative-education programs or internships which allow students the opportunity to work locally while attending classes. Participation in such programs can significantly enhance a student's employment prospects.

Forest and Conservation Worker Schools

Students who would like to continue on in their education to become foresters are encouraged to attain a bachelor's degree in forestry. The following forestry schools offer degrees in forestry and are accredited by the Society of American Foresters:

  • Purdue University: This university located in Indiana offers bachelor's degrees in forestry and sustainable biomaterials.
  • The University of Alaska: The Fairbanks campus of this state university offers a bachelor's degree in natural resource management.
  • The University of Georgia: The Warnell School of Forest Resources offers a bachelor's degree in forestry, in addition to a bachelor's degree in natural resources recreation and tourism.
  • The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences at this university offers a bachelor's degree with a concentration in resource conservation and restoration ecology.
  • The University of Maine: Bachelor's degree students at this state university in Orono can major in forestry, as well as ecology and environmental sciences.

Forestry Education Requirements

When hiring forest and conservation technicians, employer preferences vary in terms of educational qualifications. Many employers prefer job candidates to have at least one or two years of specialized training. Some favor candidates with an associate degree while some others prefer a bachelor's degree.

The forestry education requirements for foresters vary by state, but in general, both licensing and registration require completion of a 4-year degree in forestry and a period of forestry work experience. In addition, licensure usually requires candidates to take and pass a comprehensive written exam.

Many foresters pursue certification as a means of professional advancement. The Society of American Foresters certified foresters who have at least a bachelor's degree from one of its accredited programs (or from a forestry program that is substantially equivalent); five years of qualifying professional experience; and who are able to pass a qualifying examination.

Resources for Forestry Workers

Sources:

  1. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Conservation Scientists and Foresters, http://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/conservation-scientists.htm
  2. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Forest and Conservation Workers, http://www.bls.gov/ooh/farming-fishing-and-forestry/forest-and-conservation-workers.htm
  3. Purdue University, https://ag.purdue.edu/fnr/Pages/undergrad-grad-programs.aspx
  4. The University of Alaska, http://www.uaf.edu/snras/forest_sciences/
  5. The University of Georgia, http://www.warnell.uga.edu/
  6. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, http://academics.aces.illinois.edu/majors/nres
  7. The University of Maine, https://nsfa.umaine.edu/

Forest and Conservation Workers Skills

Below are the skills needed to be forest and conservation workers according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Skill NameImportanceCompetence
Coordination3.253.38
Speaking3.253
Critical Thinking3.123.12
Judgment and Decision Making3.122.88
Active Listening3.122.88

Forest and Conservation Workers Abilities

Below are the abilities needed to be forest and conservation workers according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Ability NameImportanceCompetence
Problem Sensitivity3.623.38
Oral Expression3.53.75
Oral Comprehension3.53.5
Information Ordering3.383.12
Static Strength3.383.75

Forest and Conservation Workers Knowledge

Below are the knowledge areas needed to be forest and conservation workers according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Knowledge AreaImportanceCompetence
Geography4.055.04
English Language3.83.73
Public Safety and Security3.713.49
Clerical3.684.38
Biology3.413.66

Forest and Conservation Workers Work activities

Below are the work activities involved in being forest and conservation workers according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest).

   
Work ActivityImportanceCompetence
Performing for or Working Directly with the Public4.254.86
Performing General Physical Activities4.225.38
Communicating with Persons Outside Organization4.24.98
Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work4.185.89
Making Decisions and Solving Problems4.144.74

Forest and Conservation Workers Work styles

Below are the work styles involved in being forest and conservation workers according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest).

   
Work StyleImportance
Independence4.35
Attention to Detail4.32
Cooperation4.28
Dependability4.23
Integrity4.06

Metro Areas Sorted by Total Employment for
Forest and Conservation Workers

Listed below are the 10 largest metro areas based on the total number of people employed in Forest and Conservation Workers jobs , as of 2017

   
Metro AreaTotal EmploymentAnnual Mean Salary
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim210 $28,570
Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue130 $25,740
San Diego-Carlsbad120 $23,190
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson100 $35,160
Sioux Falls60 $35,270
Salt Lake City50 $34,380
Mount Vernon-Anacortes40 $25,460
KnoxvilleN/A N/A
Rapid CityN/A N/A
Riverside-San Bernardino-OntarioN/A N/A

Compare Total Employment & Salaries for Forest And Conservation Workers

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Total employment and salary for professions similar to forest and conservation workers

Source : 2016 Occupational Employment Statistics and 2016-26 Employment Projections, Bureau of Labor Statistics, BLS.gov; O*NET® 22.1 Database, O*NET OnLine, National Center for O*NET Development, Employment & Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, onetonline.org

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We have some additional detailed pages at the state level for Forest and Conservation Workers.

Numbers in parentheses are counts of relevant campus-based schools in the state; online schools may also be available.

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