dcsimg

Training Specialists picture    Training Specialists image

Training Specialists

Training specialists plan, coordinate and oversee the training and development activities for employees. A training specialist evaluates a company or organization and decides where training would be helpful and develops a training program to meet the needs. They also evaluate current training programs and make adjustments or create a new program that is more effective.

Sample job titles include training and development specialist, job training specialist, corporate trainer, training coordinator and technical trainer.

They're employed by government agencies, businesses and institutions. Training specialists work in virtually all industries. Many work for private consulting firms and some are self-employed.

Training specialists' objectives often include developing skills, improving productivity, improving the quality of work and building worker loyalty to the company. They also instruct employees regarding a new management and reporting system and about health and safety precautions. Training programs are also designed to help employees deal with mergers and acquisitions.

They often use role-playing, classroom instructions and computers in their training programs. After the training sessions are finished they analyze the effectiveness of the training to make sure the desired results are being achieved.

Sometimes businesses employ training and development specialists to help personnel deal with the fast pace of organizational and technological change and the complexity of work environments. Training specialists help employees stay up-to-date with the latest knowledge in their field.

Responsibilities

  • Perform surveys to identify training needs
  • Provide orientation sessions and arrange for on-the-job training for new employees
  • Evaluate training and apprenticeship programs
  • Plan, develop and provide training and staff development programs
  • Prepare training manuals
  • Measure the effects of training programs
  • Provide training to instructors and supervisors in techniques and strategies for training and dealing with personnel
  • Make improvements to existing programs

Job Characteristics

Training specialists need a solid foundation in the methods and principles for curriculum and training design. They should have a thorough knowledge in teaching groups and individuals, instructional methodologies, and in adult learning theory.

Education and development specialists should have excellent teaching, communications, leadership, interpersonal and presentation skills. The ability to motivate and encourage others are important assets for the profession.

Training specialists typically work 40 hours per week. Some training specialists travel to provide training to employees at different company locations or to training settings such as hotels and conference centers.

Employment Outlook

Employment of training and development specialists is forecasted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics to grow by 23 percent from 2008 to 2018. Due to the increasing complexity of many jobs and technological advances, companies are forecasted to provide more resources to job specific training programs for their employees.

The median annual earnings of training and development specialists in 2008 was $51,450. The highest paid 10 percent earned more than $85,160. Regarding the industries employing the largest amount of training and development specialists, the highest paying industry is computer systems design and related services.

Education, Certification, and Licensing

Most training and development specialists have earned at least a bachelor's degree. Many colleges offer two and four year programs or specialized classes that are related to training. Employers often seek candidates that have earned a degree in human resource development, organizational development, personnel administration or education and human resources. Beneficial courses include audiovisual techniques, public speaking and management science.

Some employers prefer applicants that have a technical or business background or have a well-rounded liberal arts education. Some training specialists have a master's degree in a training related subject. A doctoral degree is becoming increasingly popular with personnel workers that specialize in the development of new training programs.

For training specialists that seek to move up to a training manager position, certification is beneficial. The American Society for Training and Development, the International Public Management Association for Human Resources and the Society for Human Resources Management provide certification. The Chartered Specific Institute of Personnel and Development provides professional qualification. Theory certifications are also available.

Resources

Major Employers

Some of the top employers are health services, government agencies, banks, private consulting firms, manufacturing companies, commercial training providers and retail companies.

Schools for Training Specialists are listed in the Browse Schools Section.

Training Specialists Skills

Below are the skills needed to be training specialists according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Skill NameImportanceCompetence
Learning Strategies4.254.88
Instructing4.254.25
Speaking4.124.25
Active Listening4.124.12
Reading Comprehension44.25

Training Specialists Abilities

Below are the abilities needed to be training specialists according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Ability NameImportanceCompetence
Oral Expression4.254.38
Oral Comprehension4.124.25
Written Comprehension44
Speech Clarity44.5
Written Expression44.25

Training Specialists Knowledge

Below are the knowledge areas needed to be training specialists according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 7 being highest).

   
Knowledge AreaImportanceCompetence
Education and Training4.976.92
English Language4.695.69
Customer and Personal Service44.83
Administration and Management3.674
Personnel and Human Resources3.644.42

Training Specialists Work activities

Below are the work activities involved in being training specialists according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest) and competency level on a scale of 1 to 7 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest).

   
Work ActivityImportanceCompetence
Training and Teaching Others4.946.31
Getting Information4.724.92
Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships4.675.78
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates4.586.11
Thinking Creatively4.55.28

Training Specialists Work styles

Below are the work styles involved in being training specialists according to their importance on the scale of 1 to 5 (1 being lowest and 5 being highest).

   
Work StyleImportance
Initiative4.56
Cooperation4.56
Dependability4.56
Integrity4.44
Adaptability/Flexibility4.42
Click the Visit School Site buttons to go directly to a school's website and learn more about the school and programs it has to offer. School website will open in a new tab.
Click the Request Info buttons to request more information from a representative at the school.

We have some additional detailed pages at the state level for Training Specialists.

Numbers in parentheses are counts of relevant campus-based schools in the state; online schools may also be available.